Selected Poems, 1923-58

Author(s): Edward Estlin Cummings

Poetry

"Among the most innovative of twentieth-century poets," according to Jenny Penberthy in the Dictionary of Literary Biography, E. E. Cummings experimented with poetic form and language to create a distinct personal style. A Cummings poem is spare and precise, employing a few key words eccentrically placed on the page. Some of these words were invented by Cummings, often by combining two common words into a new synthesis. He also revised grammatical and linguistic rules to suit his own purposes, using such words as "if," "am," and "because" as nouns, for example, or assigning his own private meanings to words. Despite their nontraditional form, Cummings' poems came to be popular with many readers. "No one else," Randall Jarrell claimed in his The Third Book of Criticism, "has ever made avant-garde, experimental poems so attractive to the general and the special reader." By the time of his death in 1962 Cummings held a prominent position in twentieth-century poetry. John Logan in Modern American Poetry: Essays in Criticism called him "one of the greatest lyric poets in our language." Stanley Edgar Hyman wrote in Standards: A Chronicle of Books for Our Time: "Cummings has written at least a dozen poems that seem to me matchless. Three are among the great love poems of our time or any time." Malcolm Cowley admitted in the Yale Review that Cummings "suffers from comparison with those [poets] who built on a larger scale

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Product Information

General Fields

  • : 9780571089864
  • : Faber & Faber
  • : Faber and Faber
  • : December 1959
  • : books

Special Fields

  • : Edward Estlin Cummings
  • : Paperback
  • : 100